26 September 2022 08:19

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Even as remote working blurs boundaries between work and life, APAC travelers are finding new ways to balance both by working from anywhere – including extended stays at hotels

Survey respondents across six of APAC’s leading tourism markets show increasing preference for flexibility, spotlighting why it matters where you stay when travelling for leisure, business, or a blend of both.

The pandemic has redefined travel, and as leading hospitality company, Hilton (NYSE: HLT), unpacks its newest survey findings1, travel trends spotlight how the past two years have not only changed how people travel, but why. Results revealed the lines between work and personal trips have become increasingly blurred - with vacation time increasingly being added to work trips. This signals a need to establish new rhythms of rest and reconnecting, emphasizing why now, more than ever, it matters where you stay.

“Our study shows that work trips are not only extended for extra down-time, but leisure travel also needs to be flexible and connected enough to allow for an element of remote working or working from anywhere,” said Ben George, senior vice president and commercial director, Hilton, Asia Pacific. “More than ever, this puts the spotlight on the stay itself and what the hotel experience can offer in totality. When you need to produce an inspiring presentation while on the move, it matters where you stay — the environment, food, amenities make all the difference.”

Blurring Lines Between Work and Life

The rise of remote working during the pandemic has accelerated an always-on culture, resulting in a greater want and need among employees to disconnect from constant video conferencing and the incessant ping of messaging apps.

43% of Indonesian and Malaysian travelers say they want to disconnect from work, but among them 95% and 81% still spend some time working while travelling with family.

Employed respondents from Singapore (66%) and Australia (64%) cannot seem to switch off their work mode, despite saying they would like to.

There is also the added stress of guilt associated with responding to work emails while on vacation, according to half of the respondents in Indonesia (59%), Australia (58%), Malaysia (57%), and Singapore (54%).

Remote Working From Stunning Locations

At the same time, there is an emerging preference among travelers to make the most of the remote working flexibility that more companies are now offering. Across the region, gainfully employed respondents would choose to do some form of work while travelling, with India (98%) ranked at the top, followed by Thailand and Indonesia (95%), Malaysia (81%), Singapore (65%), and Australia (64%).

This corresponds with extended stays at hotels, which offer an ideal environment for working from anywhere when it is preferred. Hilton’s booking data recorded an increase of up to two days in the average length of stay from 2019 to 2022 in Asia Pacific—with Singapore and Bangkok taking the lead at five and four days, respectively.


Remote Working From Stunning Locations

At the same time, there is an emerging preference among travelers to make the most of the remote working flexibility that more companies are now offering. Across the region, gainfully employed respondents would choose to do some form of work while travelling, with India (98%) ranked at the top, followed by Thailand and Indonesia (95%), Malaysia (81%), Singapore (65%), and Australia (64%).

This corresponds with extended stays at hotels, which offer an ideal environment for working from anywhere when it is preferred. Hilton’s booking data recorded an increase of up to two days in the average length of stay from 2019 to 2022 in Asia Pacific—with Singapore and Bangkok taking the lead at five and four days, respectively.

Footnotes

Survey conducted with nearly 6,000 respondents across Singapore, Australia, Indonesia, Malaysia, Thailand and India

Among 12 activities, sitting by pool or beach ranks #1 (19%), spa treatment ranks #3 (15%), taking a nap ranks #4 (14%). Romantic dinner with spouse/significant other ranks second at 17%.

Even as remote working blurs boundaries between work and life, APAC travelers are finding new ways to balance both by working from anywhere – including extended stays at hotels

Survey respondents across six of APAC’s leading tourism markets show increasing preference for flexibility, spotlighting why it matters where you stay when travelling for leisure, business, or a blend of both.

The pandemic has redefined travel, and as leading hospitality company, Hilton (NYSE: HLT), unpacks its newest survey findings1, travel trends spotlight how the past two years have not only changed how people travel, but why. Results revealed the lines between work and personal trips have become increasingly blurred - with vacation time increasingly being added to work trips. This signals a need to establish new rhythms of rest and reconnecting, emphasizing why now, more than ever, it matters where you stay.

“Our study shows that work trips are not only extended for extra down-time, but leisure travel also needs to be flexible and connected enough to allow for an element of remote working or working from anywhere,” said Ben George, senior vice president and commercial director, Hilton, Asia Pacific. “More than ever, this puts the spotlight on the stay itself and what the hotel experience can offer in totality. When you need to produce an inspiring presentation while on the move, it matters where you stay — the environment, food, amenities make all the difference.”

Blurring Lines Between Work and Life

The rise of remote working during the pandemic has accelerated an always-on culture, resulting in a greater want and need among employees to disconnect from constant video conferencing and the incessant ping of messaging apps.

43% of Indonesian and Malaysian travelers say they want to disconnect from work, but among them 95% and 81% still spend some time working while travelling with family.

Employed respondents from Singapore (66%) and Australia (64%) cannot seem to switch off their work mode, despite saying they would like to.

There is also the added stress of guilt associated with responding to work emails while on vacation, according to half of the respondents in Indonesia (59%), Australia (58%), Malaysia (57%), and Singapore (54%).

Remote Working From Stunning Locations

At the same time, there is an emerging preference among travelers to make the most of the remote working flexibility that more companies are now offering. Across the region, gainfully employed respondents would choose to do some form of work while travelling, with India (98%) ranked at the top, followed by Thailand and Indonesia (95%), Malaysia (81%), Singapore (65%), and Australia (64%).

This corresponds with extended stays at hotels, which offer an ideal environment for working from anywhere when it is preferred. Hilton’s booking data recorded an increase of up to two days in the average length of stay from 2019 to 2022 in Asia Pacific—with Singapore and Bangkok taking the lead at five and four days, respectively.


Remote Working From Stunning Locations

At the same time, there is an emerging preference among travelers to make the most of the remote working flexibility that more companies are now offering. Across the region, gainfully employed respondents would choose to do some form of work while travelling, with India (98%) ranked at the top, followed by Thailand and Indonesia (95%), Malaysia (81%), Singapore (65%), and Australia (64%).

This corresponds with extended stays at hotels, which offer an ideal environment for working from anywhere when it is preferred. Hilton’s booking data recorded an increase of up to two days in the average length of stay from 2019 to 2022 in Asia Pacific—with Singapore and Bangkok taking the lead at five and four days, respectively.

Footnotes

Survey conducted with nearly 6,000 respondents across Singapore, Australia, Indonesia, Malaysia, Thailand and India

Among 12 activities, sitting by pool or beach ranks #1 (19%), spa treatment ranks #3 (15%), taking a nap ranks #4 (14%). Romantic dinner with spouse/significant other ranks second at 17%.

BCE Inc.announced that 1,067,517 of its 11,397,196 fixed-rate Cumulative Redeemable First Preferred Shares, Series AA ("Series AA Preferred Shares") have been tendered for conversion on September 1, 2022, on a one-for-one basis, into floating-rate Cumulative Redeemable First Preferred Shares, Series AB ("Series AB Preferred Shares"). In addition, 1,977,982 of its 8,599,204 Series AB Preferred Shares have been tendered for conversion on September 1, 2022, on a one-for-one basis, into Series AA Preferred Shares. Consequently, on September 1, 2022, BCE will have 12,307,661 Series AA Preferred Shares and 7,688,739 Series AB Preferred Shares issued and outstanding.

The Series AA Preferred Shares and the Series AB Preferred Shares will continue to be listed on the Toronto Stock Exchange under the symbols BCE.PR.A and BCE.PR.B, respectively.

The Series AA Preferred Shares will pay on a quarterly basis, for the five-year period beginning on September 1, 2022, as and when declared by the Board of Directors of BCE, a fixed cash dividend based on an annual fixed dividend rate of 4.94%.

The Series AB Preferred Shares will continue to pay a monthly floating adjustable cash dividend for the five-year period beginning on September 1, 2022, as and when declared by the Board of Directors of BCE. The monthly floating adjustable dividend for any particular month will continue to be calculated based on the prime rate for such month and using the Designated Percentage for such month representing the sum of an adjustment factor (based on the market price of the Series AB Preferred Shares in the preceding month) and the Designated Percentage for the preceding month.

The FIFA World Cup 2022™ is a football fan’s paradise. Over 28 days of play, they’ll watch 32 national football teams compete in 64 matches, culminating in a final game that hundreds of millions of people will watch.

For an event as momentous and emotionally charged as the World Cup, many fans will even reconfigure their sleep patterns so that they can watch the games in real-time. Even with the rise of streaming and on-demand content, live TV is viewers’ preference.

The experience extends far beyond the matches—spilling out into the streets and taking over fans’ screens and feeds. But with so much happening, the competition for eyeballs is almost as intense as the battle for possession on the field. The entire media ecosystem—from the broadcasters, streamers and platforms to the brands and rights holders— needs a precise understanding of who’s watching, how they’re watching and what they care about across all regions and demographics.

This report delivers that, helping media players create the ultimate World Cup experience and helping marketers capitalize on the extraordinary content and sponsorship opportunities.

Football remains the world’s most popular sport, generating powerful interest in 40% of the global population.It was one of the three most popular sports in 10 of the 13 countries3 we analyzed, which include the world’s top 10 economies.And of the countries where football did not rank in the top three—Canada, Australia and the U.S.—it did rank in the top 10.

Football audiences cross demographic lines, including income, education and profession. Fans are of all ages, although they’re more likely to be under 50 and over-index on income versus the average person. And while, overall, more men watch football than women, women’s interest in the World Cup dwarfs all other major international football competitions. The UEFA European Championship ranks second in popularity, but female interest in that drops by 13 percentage points when compared to the World Cup.

Currently, 37% of global football fans are women.

Given their keen interest in the World Cup, it could be the right moment to prioritize speaking directly to this cohort and turn potentially casual fans into loyal ones through more thoughtful content and sponsorship integrations that surround the matches. For instance, this year is the first time the World Cup will overlap with the festive holiday season for much of the world, and women are often key holiday season spenders. So, there’s a natural bridge for brands, broadcasters and platforms to deliver holiday-related messages, content, services and merchandise directly to this audience while capitalizing on the halo of World Cup excitement.

Given the sport’s growing appeal, rights holders and content providers are increasing access to it, amplifying the World Cup buzz.For football fans who watch sports, free-to-air TV is the most popular option, while 62% pay to watch8, 72%9 tune in via social media and 68%10 view on over-the-top (OTT) streaming devices. This means brands, publishers and platforms can get creative with how they engage audiences across multiple devices.

For example, in May of 2022, TikTok announced it would be the official partner of the UEFA Women’s EURO 2022. The partnership lets TikTok users access exclusive behindthe-scenes footage from the tournament, amplify their own video content with dynamic effects, and reinforces the platform as a go-to space for all things football fandom.

Looking to the major markets in Asia, at least 50% of people in both India and South Korea are interested in football. This level of interest is matched only in Brazil, Germany, Italy, Spain and the U.K. among the nations we survey monthly. This tells only part of the story in Asia, however.

The level of interest in football in Southeast Asia is massive despite the fact that none of the countries in this region have traditionally qualified for the World Cup finals. In three of the four most populated Southeast Asian countries—Indonesia, Vietnam and Thailand—well over 50% of the population in each is interested in football. The sport is also popular with over 50% of the population of the sixth most populated Southeast Asian nation, Malaysia.

Globally, the World Cup has the highest awareness of any sporting event—95%12 of sports fans, on par with the summer and winter Olympics. Perhaps unsurprisingly then, half of sports fans are willing to pay for live/on-demand coverage of the World Cup, more than any other sports broadcast.

Good as gold:Sports sponsorships perform

Brand sponsorships are critical for clubs’ financial success. FC Barcelona recently signed a deal with Spotify that included naming rights at Camp Nou and shirt placement for the next three years. The price? US$64 million per season. Brands are also an important part of the viewing experience. Even in an era of endless distractions, viewers are paying attention to sponsorships. Fifty-six percent of football fans actively inform themselves about brands engaged as a sports sponsor, and 67% agree that companies involved in sports sponsorships gain in appeal with the audience.

Beyond the pitch: Meeting fans where they are to create an immersive experience

How fans interact with a global event like the World Cup is going to be as diverse as they are. There are behavioral differences between countries and between fans and nonfans, meaning brands and marketers need extensive data to make sure they’re actually reaching the right audience. In many places around the world, there’s already a deep tradition of large-scale, close down-the-street-type events. These are highly coveted spaces for brand activations. For example, in Berlin, the watch parties include collaborations with radio hosts and sponsors giving out free branded merch.

Perhaps unsurprisingly, Germany had the lowest percentage of fans who said they’d watch the 2018 World Cup on their phones—just 4%.21 These live events are likely to catch on more in North America, which will be hosting the 2026 World Cup across 16 host cities. While the die-hards may be glued to the game on their TV or smart device, others are busy multitasking. Of football fans who watch sports, 69% are likely to order food while watching, 67% may be checking their email, and 60% might play an online game.Globally, 42%of fans are interested in live-betting on football while watching, and in countries like Australia, France, and the U.S., the number is closer to 50%.

What fans want: 4 takeaways for the 2022 World Cup

1.The world’s sport still has room to grow

• Female football fans are more interested in the World Cup than any other major football competition. There’s an opportunity through World Cup coverage, content and sponsorships to help turn casual female fans into loyal ones.

• Asian populations and brands continue to emerge on the World’s stage. Football popularity is strong across Southeast Asia in countries with massive populations, which means that brands that capitalize on the opportunity will be well placed to reach and convert new fans in the region.

2.Data drives modern sports viewing

• Fans expect reliable, real-time data that contextualize and enhance whatever match they’re watching. This is particularly true in events like the World Cup, where one game’s outcome can impact the position of several other teams.

• When properly structured, data integrations within the viewing experience can help fans find more of the World Cup content they want, when they want it. Of the football fans that watch sports, 80% are on their device while watching a match—and they’re likely to want a lot of content.

3.Sports sponsorships win big among fans

• Football fans are more likely than the general population to be influenced by sponsorship, affecting how they perceive a brand and what they’re likely to buy.

• The non-alcoholic drinks category continues to spend the most on sponsorship (by percentage), but tourism sponsorships have made a big jump since 2018.

4.Divided fan attention means opportunities for immersion

• The overwhelming majority of fans are multitasking on their devices while watching a match. This means there are even more possibilities to integrate sponsors and engage with fans during the World Cup.

• The World Cup isn’t just a televised event. It’s the opportunity for a fully immersive experience, and the savviest broadcasters, brands and platforms will capitalize by providing content in all the places fans want to consume it.

Friday, 26 August 2022 00:00

Millennials Shaping the Workplace

Millennials make up a big portion of the workforce and are key players in any organization.

Organizations that can utilize the set skills that Millennials bring to any workplace have a great chance in succeeding as skills beget advancement. Great Place to Work has announced the top 30 Best Workplaces for Millennials in the GCC. These 30 organizations have given the power to Millennials.

What do Millennials look for in an organization?

The top companies that have made it to the Millennials list shared common practices that are of high value for Millennials. These best practices manifest cultural diversity and making a difference, two values that are held highly by Millennials.

Millennials are on the lookout for work-life balance as they believe there is more to life than having a 9 to 5 job. During the COVID pandemic, Millennials got their way as companies had to work from home and adhere to flexible working hours due to the pandemic. It is then that companies began exploring the hybrid model more, resonating with what Millennials have been standing up for.

There is a stereotype existing regarding millennials, claiming that they are entitled and have excessive demands. However, requesting to have a life outside of work is not entitlement and will not affect work performance. Employees tend to exert more effort at work once they are rested rather than stressed from working long hours. Millennials have been perceived as being disloyal to employers. However, that is a misconception as millennials tend to leave their jobs for better opportunities that provide the demands, they constantly advocate for such as flexibility, work-life balance and sense of purpose.

Technology is a gamechanger and Millennials gravitate towards companies that embrace technology. Millennials are known for being team players not to each his own. Hence, this teamwork trait can be draw on by organizations for their benefit. Technology advancement causes organizations to up their game in order to be ahead, Millennials play a key role in this process. Being tech-savvy and on top of all technology updates can give companies the needed edge to be part of the technology world. The technological skills of this age group are valuable resource that companies can utilize for their advantage.

Best Practices of our Top 30 Companies

1. Sense of Purpose

The companies that have proudly made it to the Millennials list had several common practices which landed them on the Best Workplaces for Millennials list. Playing a part in the community is a purpose Millennials perceive as a priority. Companies have given a sense of pride to their employees by ensuing that through their work, they are contributing to the community. Millennials advocate for always having a purpose and doing valuable work supports that purpose. These companies have proven that by the

service and products they offer, that they still play a key role in their communities. Millennials are the bridge between making a difference while getting the job done.

2. One Team One Goal

Employees seek management that put their trust in them and values their skills to get the job done. Hence, Millennials emphasize the importance of having managers that trust them with valuable work and exert effort in making them feel welcomed. Feeling welcomed and part of the team builds up the confidence of all employees not only new joiners.

3. Fair Treatment for All

Discrimination is a topic tackled in any organization that is willing to put the effort in making their workplace culture-friendly. Discrimination is always a struggle in any given environment, millennials stand by rights and are against discrimination in the workplace whether based on age, race or any other factor. The companies that made it to the list ranked highly when it came to their impact on the community and stances against discrimination.

Organizations tend to resort to the need-to-know basis tactic when it comes to sharing information with employees, a tactic unwelcomed by Millennials. Millennials believe that their involvement in decisions made by management is of high significance. Employers refrain from hiring millennials as they believe they seek more than a steady paycheck, instead they seek a seat on the table due to them requesting to be part of decisions. Transparency is another requirement for Millennials and this has increased and strengthened the communication between management and employees. Moreover, collaboration between employees fosters teamwork and work commitment. Constant appetite for learning is what builds the mentality of Millennials of taking full advantage of any opportunity and collaborating with others gives Millennials the space to expand their knowledge.

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